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Thermometers for taking temp of returned blood products


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For those of you who take the temperature of blood products that have been returned to you to determine if they are acceptable for reissue, what type of thermometer do you use? 

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20 hours ago, David Saikin said:

right next to your post is an ad for digitrax temp-check.Temp%20Check%2Ejpg

I do not accept returns after 15 minutes.  My study shows rbcs achieve >10C after that amount of time.

I used something similar but about 30 years older!!!  Glad to see it's been up graded.  I had a number of inspectors that did not like it because they had never seen anything like it.  They couldn't say to much about it, I had all the records showing it was verified just like all the rest of my thermometers on the same schedule. 

:coffeecup:

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We use Safe-T-Vue 10 indicators on RBCs/FFP issued in a cooler, and the Fluke 561 infrared thermometer to take the temp on products that come back that weren't issued in a cooler.

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I'm also wondering how one manages to validate that all units of blood remain within temperature range when the ambient temperature and handling is not consistent.

We can't even validate our coolers for the same reason ... and one never knows if the cooler is left open or the units are removed then replaced.

Are you using 1-10oC or 1-6oC?

FDA instructed us to use 1-6oC for the coolers because they are really 'in storage'.

If not in a cooler, we can go up to 10oC because they are 'in transit'.  I haven't implemented that part yet, but I will be soon.

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23 hours ago, Joanne P. Scannell said:

I'm also wondering how one manages to validate that all units of blood remain within temperature range when the ambient temperature and handling is not consistent.

We can't even validate our coolers for the same reason ... and one never knows if the cooler is left open or the units are removed then replaced.

Are you using 1-10oC or 1-6oC?

FDA instructed us to use 1-6oC for the coolers because they are really 'in storage'.

If not in a cooler, we can go up to 10oC because they are 'in transit'.  I haven't implemented that part yet, but I will be soon.

We use 1-6 for coolers, however, the BT-10 only shows breach above 10 so, there's that. We place a NIST certified thermometer in the cooler to show that it is 6 or below upon return. We do not scan these units with the temp gun.

It's 1-10 for anything returned not in a cooler. 

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On 3/31/2021 at 5:51 AM, Joanne P. Scannell said:

I'm also wondering how one manages to validate that all units of blood remain within temperature range when the ambient temperature and handling is not consistent.

We can't even validate our coolers for the same reason ... and one never knows if the cooler is left open or the units are removed then replaced.

Are you using 1-10oC or 1-6oC?

FDA instructed us to use 1-6oC for the coolers because they are really 'in storage'.

If not in a cooler, we can go up to 10oC because they are 'in transit'.  I haven't implemented that part yet, but I will be soon.

We recently switched to MaxQ coolers which are pre-validated by the company at storage temp.  Then we validated at transport temp and storage temp and use that for when the cooler needs to be returned for fresh ice.  Our policy specifically states this and that we consider them transport coolers.  We really like the MaxQ coolers and have seen a huge decrease in waste due to temp issues on return of the coolers.  The lids close by themselves.  They even have coolers that have temp monitoring integrated but they're super expensive.  

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Just a thought.  With an issue like this you have to come to a point of realizing that you can only do so much especially when much of the process is out of your control.  You can drive yourself crazy playing the "what if " game!  Once you've done the best you can for your situation then accept that there will probably be a fallible human somewhere in the process who will come up with a creative work around.  A nurse will put a unit in the medication refrigerator until she's ready for it or they will put it back in the cooler in OR after it's been setting next to the patient during the procedure, just in case!  Accept that you don't have complete control and never will, you'll live longer!  

:coffeecup:

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18 hours ago, Sonya Martinez said:

We recently switched to MaxQ coolers which are pre-validated by the company at storage temp.  Then we validated at transport temp and storage temp and use that for when the cooler needs to be returned for fresh ice.  Our policy specifically states this and that we consider them transport coolers.  We really like the MaxQ coolers and have seen a huge decrease in waste due to temp issues on return of the coolers.  The lids close by themselves.  They even have coolers that have temp monitoring integrated but they're super expensive.  

We just switched to the MaxQ MTP coolers and love them! My validations showed it held temps for 24 hours, even when opening the lid every 15 minutes for the first 2 hours and hourly after that. Plus, we filled the cooler with warm FFP (4 units @37C) and cold RBC (4 units @4C). The cooler cooled down the FFP units to 6C within 3 hours. The RBC'S never went above 5C. 

Edited by jayinsat
complete a sentence
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On 3/31/2021 at 8:51 AM, Joanne P. Scannell said:

I'm also wondering how one manages to validate that all units of blood remain within temperature range when the ambient temperature and handling is not consistent.

We can't even validate our coolers for the same reason ... and one never knows if the cooler is left open or the units are removed then replaced.

Are you using 1-10oC or 1-6oC?

FDA instructed us to use 1-6oC for the coolers because they are really 'in storage'.

If not in a cooler, we can go up to 10oC because they are 'in transit'.  I haven't implemented that part yet, but I will be soon.

What are you going to use in lieu of a cooler?  I think if you are using a transport box the FDA would still consider int storage if it is just hanging around in the OR or wherever.

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