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Infant transfusion units


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For those that do not irradiate on site, do you keep an irradiated unit on hand or do you keep a regular cmv= fresh unit on hand?  We get a new unit every 2 weeks and we rarely transfuse infants but we have a unit on hand just in case

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We keep 1 irradiated O Neg on hand for infant transfusions. We get a new one once a week. We also don't transfuse a lot of infants but we do have a NICU here and we will get an infant every couple of months that requires a couple transfusions.

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The hospital that I retired from recently had an irradiator so we would get 1 O negative fresh CPDA1 CMV-, HbS- unit a week. I worked at a hospital where without an irradiator and we received 1 O positive and  1 O negative CPDA1, CMV- and HbS- unit both irradiated from the supplier. Most of the time we used the units on adults who required irradiated because we rarely used them.

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15 hours ago, kimblain said:

As I am reading the AABB manual they speak about potassium release with units that are irradiated and stored for >1 day.  Did you look at this concern?

That's why folks use 'fresh' units and also why irradiated blood gets a shorter outdate than the original (unless the current outdate is less than what you would change it to.

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We routinely stock 2 O Pos, 2 A Pos and 2 O Neg Irrad units for oncology patients, so would have Irrad units available if ordered for a neonate. I think we average 1 or 2 neonate transfusions in a years time. Our irradiated units are rotated for restock about every 2 weeks and restocked when used. We do not stock CMV neg units. All our blood supply is leukoreduced, which is considered CMV safe. If we are planning a transfusion or have an anticipated birth of a baby who might need transfused we order a fresh unit or two.

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1 hour ago, AMcCord said:

All our blood supply is leukoreduced, which is considered CMV safe.

I had a corporate transfusion service medical director who was uncomfortable with the term "CMV safe" so we were required to use the phrase "CMV risk reduced"!  I know it doesn't add anything to the discussion but when I read Ann's post the memory made me smile at the lengths some folks would go.

:coffeecup:

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