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EDibble

Footwear Safety Question

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I am the safety officer for our laboratory. Recently, a new employee mentioned that she had seen a regulation regarding lab footwear that excluded clogs as a acceptable shoe in the clinical lab. Of course, we have not allowed open toes or fabric shoes for a long time, but lots of folks wear leather or rubber clogs.

I cannot find anything in OSHA or CAP that addresses this. Does anyone have a reference?

Thanks,

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Where you able to find anything more on this? I too am curious. It looks to be left up to each facility if Crocs/clogs are allowed. There is a link that talks more about this :

Hospital members have raised concerns that the Crocs with holes may not comply with the following OSHA regulations:

  1. Protective Footwear — Standard 29 CFR 1910.132 and
    CFR 1910.136(a) requires the use of protective footwear when employees are working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, or objects piercing the sole, ...
    3

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  2. Bloodborne Standard, 1910.1030, section (d)(3)(i) requiring that employers ensure protective foot gear is worn to provide protection from potential needle sticks, splashing from blood or OPIM (Other Potentially Infectious Materials) spills:
    4

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Go the the Safety Lady's web site and register for her newsletter. I don't remember the address, Google it.

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We allow clogs that have a strap or back on them so that they will not slip or fall off and allow injury. I don't know if there was a reference for this or if we just decided. Having said that, I wonder about the wisdom of allowing open back shoes any more than open front shoes, since splashes can occur either way.

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I gotta ask what is so much worse about splashes to your feet compared to your, let's say, knee?

We dont allow short skirts.... I am not sure how protective the material of slacks is, it just feels psychologically safer for us regarding the knees and legs...:omg:

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We dont allow short skirts.... I am not sure how protective the material of slacks is, it just feels psychologically safer for us regarding the knees and legs...:omg:

I'd just like to formally record that I always wear trousers myself, and never wear short skirts (or long ones come to that)!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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wwwoooahhahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

What??????????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! OUF!!!! that is good to know, I was worried there for a moment.

mmmmmmmamajklsdujdrsugeuirgreuioejiorgjieerghahahahahaahahhahaah

:hug:

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Not a Scotsman taken to wearing kilts, eh?

I just sometimes like to reexamine old ideas. It seems like the footwear thing may have its origins in other industries that required steel-toed boots to protect from squashed feet. Back in the day, with large glass jugs of nasty chemicals in labs it made pretty good sense there too. I agree that it probably can still be justified--at least for a few more years.

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Speaking of open jugs, have you seen people walk around with piping hot coffee in open mugs!!??? or come into an elevator with it ??? OMG!!! I am afraid for my face if he/she trips. I have reported this to risk management who has sent reminder memos... but to no avail some still escape the rule.

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