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Joanne P. Scannell

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  1. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from exlimey in Calibration of timers required after replacing batteries?   
    We change all batteries annually while we are doing the QA on them so it's not likely that a battery will fail during the year.  However, things do happen and I agree with exlimely, if you do have to change or replace (say it fell out for some reason) a battery, then a 'calibration' would be prudent.
    Also, we are not talking high precision here, i.e. wider acceptability range than a pipette would be, i.e. testing is done in ranges of time, not exact seconds.  This 'calibration' is just a simple check up to make sure the timer isn't totally out of range.  Most of the time, the error is the readout gets 'broken', not the accuracy of the timer.
  2. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from Malcolm Needs in Calibration of timers required after replacing batteries?   
    We change all batteries annually while we are doing the QA on them so it's not likely that a battery will fail during the year.  However, things do happen and I agree with exlimely, if you do have to change or replace (say it fell out for some reason) a battery, then a 'calibration' would be prudent.
    Also, we are not talking high precision here, i.e. wider acceptability range than a pipette would be, i.e. testing is done in ranges of time, not exact seconds.  This 'calibration' is just a simple check up to make sure the timer isn't totally out of range.  Most of the time, the error is the readout gets 'broken', not the accuracy of the timer.
  3. Thanks
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from Transfusion98 in Gel DAT   
    We validated using Anti-C3 in a Neutral Gel card.
  4. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from David Saikin in Gel DAT   
    We validated using Anti-C3 in a Neutral Gel card.
  5. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from David Saikin in Thawed A Plasma Questions   
    Yes on every question except the 2u limit.
    If we have verified the ABO Group and we need to use 'incompatible' plasma (i.e. emergency), we use our Emergency Release Protocol, e.g. MD signs for it.
    If you want to view our policy, please message me.
  6. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from Malcolm Needs in Thawed A Plasma Questions   
    Yes on every question except the 2u limit.
    If we have verified the ABO Group and we need to use 'incompatible' plasma (i.e. emergency), we use our Emergency Release Protocol, e.g. MD signs for it.
    If you want to view our policy, please message me.
  7. Haha
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  12. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell reacted to David Saikin in Anti-D in Rh negative girl who has never been pregnant nor tranfused   
    IV drug use/sharing needles;  could it have been anti-LW?
  13. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell reacted to AMcCord in LISS Validation?   
    We use PeG as our routine backup for solid phase testing. However, there is a place for LISS in our tool kit. If we have an antibody consistent with a warm auto and the patient has never been transfused, we use LISS to decrease sensitivity to get under the warm auto. If the LISS screen is negative and AHG crossmatch is compatible, we transfuse those units. We also see panreactivity in some OB and Onc patients both with solid phase and PeG. We run a solid phase panel - if panreactive, we switch to LISS following the same process we use for the warm auto.
  14. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell reacted to David Saikin in LISS Validation?   
    As a neophyte blood banker we read everything under the scope (early 70s - it was SOP).  Then took a job and worked w a very experienced blood banker (she was on a first name basis w Laurie Marsh, the Moulds' , and more of the NY blood ctr crew).  I'd ask her to look at weak agglutination (probably your kissing cells) - her response was if I wanted to call it positive - go ahead. she wouldn't.  Weaned myself off the scope after that.  I think all new BBers go thru that. 
    I also liked exlimey's statement about "playing" with different types of enhancements.  I still do.  For me, that's the interesting stuff in BB.  Like those DAT cards I rec'd.  Wish I could get them in the USA.
  15. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell reacted to slsmith in FDA Reportable?   
    I would say no as not sendng a high risk form doesn't affect the potency, safety or purity of the product. One could say not having the doctor sign the form affects the safety  because perhaps they won't watch the transfusion more closely than usual but should the transfusion still be monitored ? Anyway you could always submit a deviation just to cover the BB behind, if it isn't  reportable the FDA will  let you know. This I know as I have filed reports that were questionable to file or not to file and received notification that it wasn't .
    But  the non-conformance (not following the SOP) should be reported in whatever way the lab reports their errors internally. 
  16. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from Baby Banker in IV vs IM Rho (D) Immune Globulin   
    We switched to Rhophylac here in the hospital because 'everyone' likes having the option of giving the dose IM or IV.
    The MD's are still using RhoGam (no IV option) for their office injections (IM Only), e.g. Antenatal/Antepartum dose.
  17. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell reacted to David Saikin in how many temperature devices for Blood storage device   
    I validate the probe thermometer with my NIST thermometer (2x/yr) - in all my storage devices.  Have not used an internal thermometer in years.  Never had a problem with CAP or AABB inspections.
  18. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell reacted to sgrassley in Blood unit incompatible with many patients   
    I would pull the unit from inventory and contact the supplier. They should have the resources to investigate the problem with the donor.
  19. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell reacted to mrmic in Use of expired panel cells   
    Inspectors are like a box of chocolates, you never know what you are going to get.
    I tend to agree with those who put forth do what you are comfortable doing for validation and/or QC.   If you, your staff and pathologists are ok with your process then an Inspector (AABB or CAP) can have an opinion but they cannot tell you to stop or defend a deficiency.   If your documentation has merit then you have a strong case of how you use your expired red cells or antisera for the care of your patients.   We all do the best we can with what we have to work with.
     
  20. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from Ensis01 in Liquid Plasma   
    'Liquid Plasma' is never frozen so there's no need to thaw it therefore the outdate is not changed.
    'Thawed Plasma' is the 5 Day product which results from Thawing Frozen Plasma (in all it's various forms, FFP, FP24, etc.).
    Note: When Frozen Plasma is thawed, it is assigned a 24hr outdate.  You can extend that outdate to 5 Days IF you label it 'Thawed Plasma'.
    e.g. Frozen FFP is thawed to Fresh Frozen Plasma (24h outdate).  You can leave it that way or change it to 'Thawed Plasma' (no FFP designation) and assign a 5 Day outdate to it.  Most hospitals, if they go that route, just label it 'Thawed Plasma' with a 5 Day outdate immediately after it's thawed.  (One Step vs Two Steps)
    Note:  I'm using USA FDA rules, I don't know what they do in other countries.
  21. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell reacted to Malcolm Needs in Crossmatch compatible antibodies   
    There are quite a few (too many to mention here).
    Can I cite for you, NHSBT Guidelines in your search engine, followed by looking for SPN214/3 (SPN stands for specification) and up will pop a document entitled "The Clinical Significance of Blood Group Alloantibodies and the Supply of Blood for Transfusion., written by my very good friend Nicole Thornton, Head of Red Cell Reference at the International Blood Group Reference Laboratory in Filton (Bristol) in the UK.
    If I tell you that the document is 22 pages long, you may understand my first sentence!
  22. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from David Saikin in Flying Squad Blood   
    Without some sort of 'vending machine' device to control and document the in/out/in/out/transfused to whom information, just leaving O Neg RBCs in a refrigerator somewhere for nursing to take/return at will is not a good idea.  I'm not even sure if regulatory agencies will support that.
    Not only that, giving O Neg to 'everyone' is not good management of resources.  We (and most hospitals in our area at) restrict the use of O Neg to Females <50yrs old.  (And even that is coming up for debate in some arenas.)
    There are 'vending machines' out there that will interface with some Blood Bank Software.  Maybe someone who is using such a machine can comment on that.
  23. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell reacted to Malcolm Needs in COMPLEMENT POS DAT AND FULL CROSSMATCH   
    I can't refresh your memory, but I do know of a case of anti-Vel in the UK that caused a fatal transfusion reaction.  The DAT was positive by anti-complement only, and the anti-Vel itself could only be detected in a clotted sample, not in an EDTA sample.
  24. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from David Saikin in Liquid Plasma   
    'Liquid Plasma' is never frozen so there's no need to thaw it therefore the outdate is not changed.
    'Thawed Plasma' is the 5 Day product which results from Thawing Frozen Plasma (in all it's various forms, FFP, FP24, etc.).
    Note: When Frozen Plasma is thawed, it is assigned a 24hr outdate.  You can extend that outdate to 5 Days IF you label it 'Thawed Plasma'.
    e.g. Frozen FFP is thawed to Fresh Frozen Plasma (24h outdate).  You can leave it that way or change it to 'Thawed Plasma' (no FFP designation) and assign a 5 Day outdate to it.  Most hospitals, if they go that route, just label it 'Thawed Plasma' with a 5 Day outdate immediately after it's thawed.  (One Step vs Two Steps)
    Note:  I'm using USA FDA rules, I don't know what they do in other countries.
  25. Like
    Joanne P. Scannell got a reaction from John C. Staley in Use of expired panel cells   
    As you see from the posts here, there are various opinions of what to do. 
    Correct =The regulatory agencies do state to run some sort of controls, etc. 
    You are in charge, therefore you do what you believe is best within the guidelines when there are gray areas like this.  If you believe you should change the protocol to 'QC for the Antigen', then do that.
    Validation?  You have criteria, I'm sure, for the cells passing inspection for use.  I venture to say that most hospitals don't keep reagent RBCs more than a month or two past their outdate.  It would be interesting to hear about that.  If you are running QC for the tested antigen 'Day of Use', that's your validation that the cell is still working for your purpose.  (I maintain that 'validation' is needed for situations where QC is not going to be run, e.g. You validate the time a box will hold a temperature so you don't have to take the temperature every time.)
    We do validate that a new panel is ok by running QC Antisera with them when they arrive.  I've had inspectors tell me I must do this and I've had inspectors tell me to stop.  Hmmm … I do what I am comfortable with, i.e. err on the side of caution.
    We don't use outdated panels … too many issues. 
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