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  1. You have to change your refrigerator alarm settings to activate at 2.2C (or whatever you choose). It doesn't matter that your refrigerator never gets too cold; if you are going to store reagents (and RhIg) in a BB refrig, it has to be able to alert you when then temp is out of prescribed range.
    4 points
  2. I just answered this question. My Score PASS  
    1 point
  3. In the USA, there is an extreme shortage of techs that are blood bank competent. The ones who are are working regular overtime to fill in the shifts to provide 24/7 coverage. They are normally working at least two jobs. The field is facing a crisis as these techs who are qualified are now retiring. We just lost two of our best this year and are struggling to keep the younger, promising techs in the field. I'm afraid you won't really have a choice soon. You will have to take what you can get tech-wise and train them as best you can.
    1 point
  4. I would be absolutely terrified, especially as a patient. Sadly, the figures you quote are quoted in the UK Transfusion Laboratory Collaborative: minimum standards for staff qualifications, training, competency and the use of information technology in hospital transfusion laboratories 2014, which are recognised by such people as UKAS and the MHRA. These standards are in the process of being rewritten (for a short time, I was the IBMS representative on the group, so I know this for a fact), and I am hoping, for the sake of everyone, that these figures are tightened up. In the meantim
    1 point
  5. Hi John, it's a stand alone surgery center. Unfortunately, our pathologist isn't sure why we have two procedures, the separate CLIA numbers were his best guess. After speaking with a couple of other long time employees, I think it had to do with that surgery center not originally being owned by the hospital. I'm thinking that I'll just add a line about servicing outpatient facilities into the original emergency release procedure and retire the other one. Kelly, thanks for your response! That makes some sense, I haven't run into a situation like that before.
    1 point
  6. I would just be a bit suspicious if say there was a + reaction with A1 cells and 4+ with B cells in an apparent group O - or vice versa; or very weak reactions in a young healthy adult.....a bit of common sense required, that's all
    1 point
  7. Since we have both manual procedures and QC and automated procedures and QC, we have left our manual QC with just the recommended "positive" controls. Since the ECHO runs 3 QC reagents and winds up with a "positive" and a "negative" for all of the reagents (usually the same lot numbers in both sets) we thought that was enough. We are FDA and Joint Comm. and they have been happy so far.
    1 point
  8. Here is the procedure that goes along with the form we made up. TS03.1025 Daily Reagent QC - Copy.docx
    1 point
  9. DebbieL

    TRM.30700

    You do not need to register with the FDA if you are just pooling, thawing, changing FFP to Thawed Plasma or splitting units like for pediatric use. The end product is basically the same as the beginning product. However, if you take a product and make a new product then you would need to register with FDA. An example would be combining RBC with FFP to make whole blood for an exchange transfusion. The end product is different from the starting product. I found a good explanation for this on the AABB site. 2012 ASK THE FDA and CLIA Transcript question #29. You can access and print thes
    1 point
  10. Hi Bertie, I'll do my best. The very best way to adsorb out an auto-antibody is to use autologous red cells (i.e. auto-adsorption). Such an adsorption will take out any auto-antibody, leaving behind any alloantibody, however rare the specificity of the alloantibody may be. To put it another way, if the auto-antibody is panreactive, but underneath that is, say, an anti-Lan (an antibody directed against a very high frequency antigen), however many times you adsorb the patient's plasma with autologous red cells, you will not remove the anti-Lan because the patient is, by definition of the fact
    1 point
  11. Hi all, Can I have your opinions/policies regarding the following please? We currently have 15 members of the on call rota, 12 of these are not transfusion staff. Therefore we only get 2 sessions a month and sometimes wont be performing any serology for weeks. Everyone does have to do 10 days in here per annum. More people want to join the rota and the pathology manager thinks this is a great idea. I am concerned that, especially the ones new to transfusion, won't be particularly competent with that level of experience. Thanks, Rich
    0 points
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