Jump to content
PathLabTalk

Confirmatory test for ABO groups in first attend patients


Recommended Posts



There have been many improvements over my career.  Now, of course, we have barcode scanners being used by our phlebotomists which have greatly decreased the number of mislabeled samples.  We also have Epic BPAM for transfusions.  However, we are all human and we still have the rare specimen error, usually in a hurried/emergent situation (when SOP's sometime go out the window, unfortunately).  A bedside ABO slide type would have saved the patient in Texas that recently passed from an ABO HTR.  :(

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

As per CAP standards TRM.30575 Misidentification risk: Verify ABO/Rh on second sample prior to transfusion and TRM.40670 ABO Group and Rh(D) type verification,  we order a non-billable TYPE2/WEAKD and result to meet the requirement for electronic crossmatch and/or type specific blood to be issued on a patient with no historical data.  This a new order/draw.. specimen must have blood bank id documented on tube by collector at time of collection in the presence of patient. if a second sample cannot be obtained and there is no documented previous ABO/Rh, immediate spin crossmatch performed using non type specific blood. if the phlebotomist is still on duty and has a clear recollection of patient they may be allowed to take tubes from earlier draw to patients bedside to re-identify patient and sample, placing blood bank id sticker on that tube. we usually use CBC tube from am draw. anytime a type and screen ordered on hosp patient the phleb asks the bb tech if a prev type exists if not a type2 is ordered on new order number requiring second venipuncture.

are your bedside test cards properly labeled date/time/init blood bank id, patient LIS label /order label to compare to patient wristband? are the results entered into patient chart?

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A policy of nurses doing an ABO test at the bedside prior to transfusion makes me uneasy and it has taken a while to figure out and try to articulate why. Fundamentally it seems to me that if this policy is needed then the hospitals system of blood collection needs a total overhaul.

To put it another way having nurses do an ABO test at the bedside prior to transfusion creates an extra layer in the transfusion process that will inevitably (in my opinion) cause delays, create confusion and problems that will need to be resolved by the bloodbank. Plus there is the need for training, validating the kit, monitoring etc.

There are several threads (and lots of discussion) on this site expanding on different and effective ways to implement the second ABO check. There are also several treads on efficiently, and safely getting blood to patients emergently in different and difficult situations. Designing a robust process from the ground up would, in my opinion, be more efficient, safer and easier to control, audit and hold those that make errors accountable.

So am I being paranoid, short sighted or just do not like change. Thoughts anyone

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ensis01, I think you are absolutely correct.

In the UK, the MHRA (a Bengal tiger of an accrediting agency) have all but banned Quality from introducing another layer of checking in any process, on the grounds that this just introduces another point at which something can go wrong.  As you articulated, it is better to tighten up on the process already in place.  As I mentioned above, allowing nurses to check the ABO type at the bed is highly dangerous in my opinion.  The test is almost too easy and, as a result, could lead to complacency, particularly when they are busy (or should be) doing the job for which they HAVE been trained.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember when I was in the UK a rep showing me a device they have for such a purpose, would have either been from Immucore or Ortho but cannot say for definite which one. If I remember correctly he said they were aimed at countries that require bedside checking of ABO prior to transfusion so there must be some countries out there where this is a requirement and there is a market for it. The device he showed me looked very much like the Diamed malaria strip test, a Elisa in a clear plastic case that gave bands for the positive reactions. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/28/2019 at 3:11 PM, mpmiola said:

We have already thought about releasing red blood cells from group O until a confirmation, but it was not well accepted at the time. Do you have problems with stock due to red blood cell release "O" until confirmation? How do you do for underweight children? Do you wash the red blood cells to remove antibodies?

Surprisingly, the change had little effect on our group O usage. We did not wash cells.  We were allowed to use properly identified Hematology samples collected in the last 24 hours, at a different time from the BB sample, for the second type. We started a blood management program about the same time where Hgbs or Hcts had to be documented prior to issuing blood so Hematology samples were usually available, even on children.  We did the second sample type on all type and screens so if they decided to transfuse we were ready.  Different areas of the hospital had to be treated differently. For example, when we had a pre admit patient who needed a second sample, we did a type and screen on the preadmit sample,  ordered the second ABO, called and had a note placed on the chart not to send patient to surgery until that was collected, and left a note in Blood Bank.  By working with surgery, ER, and the floors, the change was not nearly as bad as I had feared.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 08/04/2019 at 14:27, BldBnker said:

Houve muitas melhorias em minha carreira. Agora, é claro, temos scanners de código de barras sendo usados por nossos flebotomistas que diminuíram muito o número de amostras erroneamente rotuladas. Nós também temos Epic BPAM para transfusões. No entanto, somos todos humanos e ainda temos o raro erro de espécime, geralmente em uma situação apressada / emergente (quando os SOPs às vezes saem pela janela, infelizmente). Um tipo de slide ABO de cabeceira teria salvado o paciente no Texas que recentemente passou de um ABO HTR.  :(

 

I'm very afraid of this happening here.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Advertisement

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.