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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/03/2021 in all areas

  1. I assume that as there are no decimal points involved there is little, if any, variability on day to day readings. Remember the purpose of daily checking the scale is to ensure it is fit for YOUR purpose at the max acceptable ranges in variability, which is why information is harder to find, each lab has to determine what is appropriate for them. Therefore if your inspectors have no problem with the range why would you. An additional advantage of the wide range is that you will/may see a drift in readings if the scale starts to malfunction and so have time to call someone in to fix it before you can no longer use it. I personally see no reason to make things harder without good reason or just because you can.
    1 point
  2. At my previous hospital we would accept and use a historical ABO from another lab but only if it came from within our hospital system.
    1 point
  3. I prefer to start with more cheaper reagent.
    1 point
  4. Assuming you don't want to count the frequency of B or O and just want to know how many B or O neg units you need to screen it should be 0.34 X 0.25 X 0.9 X 0.99 or so (frequencies from memory) which gives you 7.5%. If you screen about 15 units, you should find one--unless the blood supplier has kept all of those negative units or you have bad luck. Statistics don't hold up well for small numbers so you might screen 30 before finding 1, then will find 3 in the next 30. Hope I got that right.
    1 point
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