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Hello all.  We are choosing between a Beckman DxH and a Sysmex XN.  I would like comments from people who have recently (within 2 years) purchased either of these.  Pros and cons.  Specifically if you have the slide maker/stainer. Thanks.

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We recently retired our old-old Coulter LH780 and LH500s and replaced them with DxHs.  The system at the main lab is actually a linked set of DxHs that run under one control system.  They seem to work fine once we got past a few odd break-in problems.  If you are familiar with Coulters, you would have to get used to the newer workstation interface, but they run pretty much the same with some technical improvements.  We like em.

I would not recommend having a linked set installed.  You have more versatility with two separate units.

 

Scott

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we just renewed our contract with Beckman and replaced three overworked DxH's with brand new ones. our setup is all three connected in a line with the SMS at the end (and by the end of the year connected to the Power Express). Honestly, the only other system I would even consider switching to (based on comments read on numerous other forums) is the Sysmex XN.  You have a tough choice there. If your facility is anything like mine, the finance department will make the final call. 

You'll have a choice of creating a connected line with both Sysmex and Beckman. Scott mentioned the connection doesn't work well for his lab - and I find that true for the other labs in our health system. For my lab, it works great. The SMS has pros and cons. LOTS of maintenance. We run a Wright-Giemsa stain, and the lines that handle the stain-buffer mix have developed what I have diagnosed as "coronary artery disease". That mix gets swampy and gross and clogs things up. They finally made a modification that makes flushing with methanol easier, but it is time consuming (45 minutes). BUT the slides are awesome! In my opinion, if you're looking for a system with a slidemaker stainer, I would lean toward Sysmex.

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Our laboratory had Beckman DxH for some years, but always had issues with them, and an engineer was called out almost every week. Since switching to Sysmex XN, it has been a doddle. Love the interface, and works without a glitch (for almost a year). Worth considering the Sysmex over the Beckman

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My lab just signed a contract for 4 units of DxH and 2 units of SMS. They are currently evaluation, and already the field engineers have to come down for repairs. Not sure how the break-down rate will be like once we have their lab automation operational.

My colleagues from other hospitals generally gave good feedbacks for XN. Just that we feel that their coagulation system is lacking as compared with that of Stago's.

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Sysmex XN; less maintenance, direct technical service monitoring- will contact you if trends are noted in QC and X-bar-B statistics, reduced frequency in reagent change (example: isoton diluent changed approx. once every 6 months- depending on use) New Parameter- IPF= Immature Platelet Function- gives insight on functionality of new circulating platelets, helps physician decide on platelet transfusion; second new parameter gives insight on health of reticulocytes, physician can decide on rbc transfusion or other treatment (I do not recall name or initials of this parameter) can be set to auto repeat testing that meet preset criteria, minimal downtime, tests pediatric specimens with greater precision and uses less specimen (for adult samples as well) ; slide maker strainer unit- uses less stain, stains slide individually, must clean slide individual slide cassettes with methanol daily, sound construction and infrequent technical service.  

DXH: More maintenance, no direct monitoring by tech service, frequent technical service calls for hardware and software issues, greater downtime, run qc more frequently, change reagents much more frequently, no newer parameters, no auto repeat, uses greater specimen volume; the SMS unit has inherent design problem such that minor stain explosions can occur sending stain all throughout the inside of the instrument and the floor; it was said that stain on the floor is a laughable trait of this SMS system, this SMS unit has greater downtime by comparison; main design problem seems to be associated with the Wright Stain line whereby this line becomes clogged with stain precipitate frequently despite manufacturer's recommended weekly flush with methanol; having used this unit for some six years I would recommend a daily flush with methanol.

No disrespect to Dr Coulter, a hero in hematology, but I would say that the Sysmex is far more advanced and reliable, with less maintenance, less reagent use, and more reliable technical service, as compared to the DXH. I think that having worked through the merger of Beckman and Coulter, the Hematology instruments have become less competitive. I understand, however, that for some there is a significant price difference.

I hope this helps a little.

Also, Sysmex handles lipemic specimens directly with dilution and calculations automatically maid and reported; DXH does not have this capability.

Edited by rravkin@aol.com

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Just some notes on the above regarding DxHs.  There is very little routine maintenance on our Coulters.  Direct monitoring IS available -- we have it on our two here at the hospital.  Qc is run one level per shift (required by regulators) just like any other hema analyzer.  We had one annoying issue with one of the analyzers that took about three weeks to figure out when we started using them.  Since then no big problems. 

The most common change for reagents is a new diluent cube about once or twice a day, but there are not that many reagents on a Coulter, and they are in smaller cubes that are easy to change.  Not sure about consumable costs versus other analyzers.   Auto repeat is programmable.  Specimen volume is pretty small -- but it does use special micro-tainers (that work pretty well). 

We do not use a slide-maker/stainer because we simply do not make that many slides--not worth the cost or trouble.  But I have heard that Coulter is not the only vendor were they are problematic.

If possible, I suggest you visit another site and see an analyzer before buying something you are going to be using for years to come.

Scott

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On ‎9‎/‎7‎/‎2017 at 8:25 AM, SMILLER said:

Just some notes on the above regarding DxHs.  There is very little routine maintenance on our Coulters.  Direct monitoring IS available -- we have it on our two here at the hospital.  Qc is run one level per shift (required by regulators) just like any other hema analyzer.  We had one annoying issue with one of the analyzers that took about three weeks to figure out when we started using them.  Since then no big problems. 

The most common change for reagents is a new diluent cube about once or twice a day, but there are not that many reagents on a Coulter, and they are in smaller cubes that are easy to change.  Not sure about consumable costs versus other analyzers.   Auto repeat is programmable.  Specimen volume is pretty small -- but it does use special micro-tainers (that work pretty well). 

We do not use a slide-maker/stainer because we simply do not make that many slides--not worth the cost or trouble.  But I have heard that Coulter is not the only vendor were they are problematic.

If possible, I suggest you visit another site and see an analyzer before buying something you are going to be using for years to come.

Scott

Hi Scott,

I guess you have a better service package than what I currently work with. But you say that you run one level of control each shift and does that mean that you never have a need to run all three levels of QC consecutively in a 24hr period? How long have you had your DXH's? As far as the slide-maker-stain is concerned, I have worked with both Beckman/Coulter and Sysmex instruments and from my experience the Sysmex SMS is a better and more reliable choice. I had the opportunity to learn about the new line of Sysmex  instrument in a one-on-one, four hour lesson with a technical rep and I think that the Sysmex is the better of the two instruments. I in no way connected to Sysmex or DXH from a sales perspective or any other perspective other than being an end user. From the direct experiences I have had with both of these instruments I think that the Sysmex comes out on top.

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For routine Hematology and Coag analyzers, CLIA/JCAHO requires at least two levels a day and at least once per "shift" -- we are going with 8 hours as a shift definition.  CAP and other regulators may have different requirements.

I have heard that Coulter slide maker\strainers are problematic.  But we have never used them here.

Scott

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