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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/20/2021 in all areas

  1. I've summarized the data in this letter: https://www.bmj.com/content/366/bmj.l4968 In randomized trials, the fresher blood arm is associated with a higher incidence of nosocomial infection (immunomodulation, presumably). There has never been any data examining clinical outcomes that actually favors using very fresh blood. Mostly just "expert opinion" and "it seemed like a good idea." That's not good enough now, in my view. Two key references (one only published in abstract form) are: Alexander PE, Barty R, Fei
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  2. Our neonatal intensive care transfusions are all irradiated because many severe immunodeficiency states are not evident until weeks to months after birth. These are rare, and leukoreduced transfusions probably mitigate the risk of GVHD somewhat, but we are erring on the side of caution. We irradiate just before transfusion so the storage based problems with irradiated red cells are less of a concern. We define fresh as <21 days of storage, because the data suggest very fresh blood is actually more dangerous to patients than blood stored 7-21 days or so. Seat of the pants, to be sure, but
    1 point
  3. No bad outcomes at all. So I suppose your next question would be " then why change anything?" Which would be a good question!
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  4. I looked at Quotient and Hemobioscience. Could not find that kit.
    1 point
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