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There is a donor that reacts with two polyclonal anti-s antisera from 2 different manufacturers but not a monoclonal anti-s (contains clone P3BER). Is this likely to be an s antigen variant? Quite sure that the donor was genotyped as s positive which is the only reason we tested with polyclonal antisera after we got a negative result with the monoclonal anti-s. Donor is Mi(a+). Anybody seen anything similar? Thanks in advance. 

Edited by Blood_Banker

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Yes. In the examples I've seen, the usual the culprit is a gene re-arrangement that results in expression of the Dantu antigen. If I remember correctly, the P3BER clone does not react with Dantu+ cells. If it isn't mentioned in the Directions for Use, you could check with the technical people at Millipore/Bioscot.

The presence of "Mia" (an obsolete umbrella term that can apply several "Miltenberger" antigens), already indicates that some MNS gene shuffling has occurred.

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2 hours ago, exlimey said:

Yes. In the examples I've seen, the usual the culprit is a gene re-arrangement that results in expression of the Dantu antigen. If I remember correctly, the P3BER clone does not react with Dantu+ cells. If it isn't mentioned in the Directions for Use, you could check with the technical people at Millipore/Bioscot.

The presence of "Mia" (an obsolete umbrella term that can apply several "Miltenberger" antigens), already indicates that some MNS gene shuffling has occurred.

I was going to suggest that you check with the manufacturer.  If you haven't already, look at the package insert.  

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Thanks. Finally found a great journal article about this phenomena - just takes googling the right keywords to find something. Here is a link for those interested.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/vox.12909

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On 7/31/2020 at 4:42 PM, Blood_Banker said:

Thanks. Finally found a great journal article about this phenomena - just takes googling the right keywords to find something. Here is a link for those interested.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/vox.12909

Oops. Perhaps "Mia" is not as obsolete as I believed.:) Great article/reference.

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We had a situation with discordant/variable little s typings (but caucasian) and genotyping came back without flags as little s+. In the end, the patient had a glycophorin hybrid that required sequencing to determine with an antibody classified as anti-Ena.  

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18 minutes ago, e specificity said:

We had a situation with discordant/variable little s typings (but caucasian) and genotyping came back without flags as little s+. In the end, the patient had a glycophorin hybrid that required sequencing to determine with an antibody classified as anti-Ena.  

Eek ! I hope they don't need transfusion.

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