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dothandar

Billing for autologous frozen blood

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Posted (edited)

Here is a scenario regarding autologous donation for patients with antibodies to high incidence antigens for blood center. 

Upon freezing, procedure code CPT-86932 is billed for freezing and thawing preparation 

When the product is used, product code P9039(deglyc) or P9054(frozen+washed) is billed for freezing and deglycerolization. At this point, does 96932 needed to be refunded, since this autologous donor has already been billed for freezing procedure code? 

 

Edited by dothandar

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As someone who was born and brought up, and still lives, under the NHS system, I still find it quite incredible that someone who has been unfortunate enough to have been born with genes that result in the non-expression of a high prevalence antigen, and who have then produced an antibody directed against the same antigen (and this is USUALLY a female, because of pregnancy - so we are talking sex discrimination here) should be charged more for a unit of blood than someone who is fortunate enough to have a bog standard blood type with no atypical antibodies.

Sorry if I am out of order here.

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19 hours ago, Malcolm Needs said:

As someone who was born and brought up, and still lives, under the NHS system, I still find it quite incredible that someone who has been unfortunate enough to have been born with genes that result in the non-expression of a high prevalence antigen, and who have then produced an antibody directed against the same antigen (and this is USUALLY a female, because of pregnancy - so we are talking sex discrimination here) should be charged more for a unit of blood than someone who is fortunate enough to have a bog standard blood type with no atypical antibodies.

Sorry if I am out of order here.

 I would love to have a national system where all transfusion/transplant patients are treated equally regardless of their genetic basis, here, in the US. Unfortunately here in the States, blood is often times is looked as a commodity and treated as such, as well as the services that goes with it. I do not even want to start talking about how deficient our healthcare system is. 

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I am thinking now, that if you want to know where the US healthcare system is going, you would want to look at whatever Russia is doing...

Scott

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