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I've been in blood banking for about 15mos now, and have interests in IRL later on in my career. One thing I still have yet to wrap my brain around are adsorptions, and I've only performed a het. twice. Conceptually, they are not covered much in the MLS program at university (they barely even mentioned an eluate) and I've been told at my lab that one day the science of adsorptions will just "click." Autologous seems to make a bit more sense; it's using a pt's own cells to remove an autoAb from pt plasma, then manipulating that plasma to test for allos. However, heterologous testing is trickier, especially in the sense of picking the correct phenotypically expressed cell lines. You have R1R1, R2R2, and rr, but within each of those are an additional R1R1, R2R2, and rr tested? Even the worksheet I've seen has blocks of color all over it and just looks foreign.

Are there any resources or particularly helpful explanations some fellow blood bankers can help me utilize to figure out these guys? Sometimes a peer explanation reduced to colloquialisms and less jargon help it stick. Thanks in advance! :wave:

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Ward-X, if you go to the Library in Browse, click on Educational Materials, and go to page 3 of 4, you will find, near the bottom, a PowerPoint lecture entitled, "Laboratory Investigation of Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia" that I submitted in December of 2006 (a bit old now, of course, but still fairly relevant), you will find a bit about adsorptions from slide 50 to slide 57, and there is a Word document that accompanies the lecture explaining some of the slides.

It is by no means the "be all and end all" of explanations, but it may help a little.

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On 8/26/2019 at 7:53 AM, Malcolm Needs said:

Ward-X, if you go to the Library in Browse, click on Educational Materials, and go to page 3 of 4, you will find, near the bottom, a PowerPoint lecture entitled, "Laboratory Investigation of Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia" that I submitted in December of 2006 (a bit old now, of course, but still fairly relevant), you will find a bit about adsorptions from slide 50 to slide 57, and there is a Word document that accompanies the lecture explaining some of the slides.

It is by no means the "be all and end all" of explanations, but it may help a little.

 

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On ‎8‎/‎26‎/‎2019 at 7:53 AM, Malcolm Needs said:

Ward-X, if you go to the Library in Browse, click on Educational Materials, and go to page 3 of 4, you will find, near the bottom, a PowerPoint lecture entitled, "Laboratory Investigation of Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia" that I submitted in December of 2006 (a bit old now, of course, but still fairly relevant), you will find a bit about adsorptions from slide 50 to slide 57, and there is a Word document that accompanies the lecture explaining some of the slides.

It is by no means the "be all and end all" of explanations, but it may help a little.

Although this mainly covered the preparation/reasoning and less so the conceptual basis, the latter slides from 60 on were quite helpful. Thanks!

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